The "Secret" Formula for Poker Success

After having conducted 55 interviews of The Mindset Advantage Podcast I’ve learned something about what it takes to be a successful poker player. As it turns out, there are a couple of important drivers of success that are relatively easy to implement. Ironically, most of us know what these are, but we don’t prioritize them as important.

 

The first thing you need to accept is that every field has certain fundamentals or key disciplines that need to be practiced daily. Things like regular study, exercise, meditation, and eating well come to mind. Take a couple of minutes and think about your own fundamentals. What are your key disciplines that if you did them consistently would lead you to success?

 

Typically our fundamentals are easy to implement, but they are also easy to skip over. The best poker players have identified their fundamentals and they do them consistently. Successful poker players make a habit of doing the things that less successful players don’t like to do.

 

If you want to be extraordinary, look at the things that you know you should be doing but avoid because you just don’t feel like doing them.

 

For example, maybe you know that exercising regularly would build your stamina and allow you to play longer sessions, but you’ve yet to make exercise a non-negotiable habit.

 

Perhaps you know that clearing your head before a playing session is optimal for you, but you don’t like to meditate.

 

Whatever your fundamentals are, start doing them immediately. Most of us subscribe to the myth that we need to be motivated to get started. The truth is motivation follows behavior. Once you get going, you'll probably get motivated to keep going! Don’t let your feelings drive your behavior. Decide what you want and commit to doing the key disciplines that will get you there.


The secret to success is really not a secret. It’s just a matter of identifying your key disciplines and then making a habit out of doing them each day - even if it’s only for a few minutes. Just like compound interest, small actions taken consistently over a long period of time exert a compound effect. That is, they add up and can make all of the difference!